Backing Up

Coming up with a reliable backup policy is a challenge as data volumes grow. My approach is as follows. On a weekly basis I do a full backup of the system disk of the more "volatile" PCs in our collection, … Continue reading

Thursday, February 4, 2016 in PCs/Laptops, Photography, Thoughts on the World

Snap!

As you know, I enjoy looking for patterns and coincidences. One potential source is the various ways I display my photo portfolios, and I occasionally spot the screensavers on two devices, for example, showing related images. This is interesting, but … Continue reading

Thursday, January 28, 2016 in Photography, Thoughts on the World

Weinberg’s New Law, and the Upgrade Cascade

When I started the experiment of running Windows on a MacBook (continued here and here), I really expected it to just be a "travel" laptop, continuing with something like my Alienware R17X as primary machine. That changed rapidly when I … Continue reading

Friday, January 22, 2016 in PCs/Laptops, Thoughts on the World

An Open Letter to Panasonic

I was recently invited to provide some feedback to Panasonic on the design of the GX8, and thoughts for its successor. I’ve decided to draft this in the form of an open letter, and also post it on my blog. … Continue reading

Thursday, January 7, 2016 in Photography

Platform Flexibility – It’s Alive!

The last post, written largely back in November and published just before Christmas suggested that camera manufacturers should focus on opening up their products as development platforms, much as has happened with mobile phones. While I can’t yet report on … Continue reading

Monday, January 4, 2016 in Agile & Architecture, Android, Code & Development, Photography, Thoughts on the World

Do We Want Product Development, or Platform Flexibility?

There’s been a bit of noise recently in the photography blogosphere relating to how easy it is to make changes to camera software, and why, as a result, it feels like camera manufacturers are flat out not interested in the … Continue reading

Tuesday, December 22, 2015 in Agile & Architecture, Code & Development, Photography, Thoughts on the World

A Surprisingly Tricky Subject

This really shouldn’t difficult. The image above is from the entrance to the Rinpung Dzong, in Paro. It’s a series of pictures of Buddhist deities which have been painted on bits of cloth, glued to the wall, and joined at … Continue reading

Bhutan: What Technology Worked, and What Didn’t

Bhutan isn’t especially demanding on equipment. If your style of photography is similar to mine you will need a wide range of focal lengths, from ultra-wide (for when there’s limited space in front of a large building) to long telephoto … Continue reading

Tuesday, December 15, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Photography, Travel

Last Light

Bhutan: What Worked and What Didn’t Sorry it’s been quiet for a couple of weeks. Inevitably there’s catching up to do on the return from a trip, plus I’ve had a couple of practical challenges before I could start properly … Continue reading

Friday, December 11, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Photography, Travel

The World’s Worst Panorama – 2015

It’s become a bit of a tradition that on the last night of these trips I try and take a panoramic picture of the group, usually under lighting, compositional and alcohol level challenges which would try a saint! I’m quite … Continue reading

Thursday, November 26, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Travel

Return to Kathmandu

We have an early start to our return journey, bidding farewell to Bhutan in the dark. The flight back to Kathmandu is eventless, except for a slight argument about which mountain is Everest! Between somewhat poorer viewing conditions, an unfamiliar … Continue reading

Oh Well…

You’d think that with tens of thousands of pounds worth of equipment, umpteen years of experience and an undying dedication to their art, 12 other photographers could take a nice picture of me. However, this was the handicraft of a … Continue reading

Wednesday, November 25, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Photography, Travel

To The Tiger’s Nest

Well I did it! This is Paro Taktsang, otherwise known as the Tiger’s Nest, a monastery founded in the 15th Century which sits on a cliff edge over 1000m above the floor of the Paro Valley. Apart from the obvious … Continue reading

The Return to Paro

Another fairly early start. I’m feeling a bit wobbly, as are some of the others, but we put this down to maybe a bit more beer than ideal last night, as a form of anaesthetic after the long drive. We … Continue reading

Monday, November 23, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Travel

Just So You Understand What I’m On About

Typical roadside shot. Note the vehicle coming the other way… I’m full of admiration for our driver, Chorten, who has managed long drives in very difficult conditions, safely, accurately and as smoothly as the roads and vehicle allow! Continue reading

Co-operative Macaques

These friendly fellas were just sitting on the roadside yesterday, part of a larger troupe, but this is one of the best shots. Apologies for the somewhat obvious maleness of the one on the left, but given the number of … Continue reading

Bread Delivery

Some of you will know that I have an unerring knack to home in on bread, wherever it is and in whatever form. I couldn’t possibly miss this shot! Continue reading

On the Road Again

We have a 4.30 start for the long drive back to Punakha. I grumble a bit but this turns out to be a good call and our misty and cold but unaccompanied drive to Tsonga completes in an hour less … Continue reading

Bhumtang Yiddle-I-Po

Well, Bhumtang may well be a land of breath-taking sweeping vistas and intriguing details, but my room overlooks the local timber yard, and it looks very cold out. I start the day with a bath. The hotel is a triumph … Continue reading

From Nobgang to Bumthang…

Via Nobding (with more phalluses) – I couldn’t make this up if I tried! Today was essentially a very long and somewhat boring drive, to the “alpine” bit of Bhutan. Although start and end are probably only 50km apart as … Continue reading

The Monastery Institute

After a somewhat later start, we drive up a steep mountain road to Nalanda Monastery Institute, basically a training school for Buddhist monks, with several of the initiates only 6 years of age. It’s ironic that these boys are entering … Continue reading

Friday, November 20, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Travel

Tantric Temple

After a very meagre breakfast (breakfasts are getting steadily worse while the other meals may be improving slightly), we have a short drive and then start off by walking up to a temple which nestles on a hilltop below some … Continue reading

In Close

I’ve discovered that I’m tending to go to extremes with my lenses on this trip. The shot in the previous post used the 12-35mm at 12mm. This shot was taken down into the Punakha valley from above, using the 100-300mm … Continue reading

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Photography, Travel

Of Temples, Portals and Knobs…

We leave Thimphu via a small mountain road which climbs rapidly our of the city towards the north-east. We are treated to great views of the Buddha, which although below the summit is brilliantly positioned and visible from all over … Continue reading

The Golden Bhudda

Self explanatory, I hope! Continue reading

Tuesday, November 17, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Travel

Culture and Food

We’ve had another good day. We start at the National Memorial Chorten (a sort of shrine), which is very busy but I get some good shots of old ladies cleaning all the brass lamps, and then the brass lamps burning. … Continue reading

To Thimpu

6am: I’ve just woken up and we have to repack and get out early, and there are no lights, so while I can see to type (and the Wifi is working, oddly), I can’t see a bloody thing otherwise. This … Continue reading

Sunday, November 15, 2015 in Bhutan Travel Blog, Travel

Long Drive, but Worth It

On Saturday we do a long loop drive via the Chelela Pass, which links the Paro Valley to the one which borders Tibet, and then back round the end of the valley. The pass is at 13,000 feet, and the … Continue reading